Are Zionist Terrorists a Protected Species?

Will Zionists be able to run the beautiful Earth into eternal damnation, or will Gentiles be able to overcome the evil?

It’s as if, over the last few decades, the term Semite has been hi-jacked to exclusively reference people who observe the Jewish faith and even includes white European Jews,  most of whom are unlikely to be able to trace their ancestry back to any of the historically Semitic ethnic, cultural or racial groupings.

Flashback from 2018
In the middle of the last century there was such a thing as Zionist Terrorism but today, criticizing Zionism is considered anti-Semitic.

Given that Zionism is an ideology supported by many non-Semites, you do have to question why challenging this ideology is considered anti-Semitic at all?

According to Wikipedia, Zionismis both ‘an ideology and nationalist movement’ but it is never described as a religion or a peculiar trait of a specific racial group.

Of course that brings me neatly onto the question of how anti-Semitism has become a label that exclusively references people who observe the Jewish faith.

Technically, the term ‘Semite’ references a specific Semitic speaking, ethnic, cultural, racial group that lived throughout the ancient Near East, including the Levant, Mesopotamia, the Arabian Peninsula and the Horn of Africa from the third millennium BC.

In fact, according to Britannica, the term ‘Semites’ “came to include Arabs, Akkadians, Canaanites, Hebrews, some Ethiopians, and Aramaean tribes… Mesopotamia, the western coast of the Mediterranean, the Arabian Peninsula, and the Horn of Africa”

It’s as if, over the last few decades, the term Semite has been hi-jacked to exclusively reference people who observe the Jewish faith and even includes white European Jews,  most of whom are unlikely to be able to trace their ancestry back to any of the historically Semitic ethnic, cultural or racial groupings.

This then begs the questions that if most European Zionists are probably not even ethnically, culturally or racially Semitic, how has it become normalized to label any criticism of Zionism as anti-Semitic?

For that matter, as Zionism is effectively an ideology that supports white European colonial occupation of Palestinian Arab lands, why is criticizing white European Zionism considered anti-Semitic whilst the occupation and persecution of people who could actually trace their ethnicity, culture and racial grouping back to Semitic peoples not be considered anti-Semitic?

By the way, there’s also such a thing as Christian Zionism and Zionist Churches.

It turns out that some Christians believe that the return of the Jews to the Holy Land is prophecised in the bible and so some Christians see the Jewish return to Israel as a prerequisite for the second coming of Jesus.

So if Zionist ideology is not an exclusively Jewish doctrine then why is it anti-Semitic to criticize Zionism, or is criticizing Zionism both anti-Semitic and anti-Christian, at the same time, despite the fact that a good proportion of European Jews and Christians are unlikely to have any Semitic ancestry?

Isn’t it time we also recognized the fact that ‘Zionism’ is just white European colonialism and that the ‘State of Israel’ is effectively the last European colonial project, albeit born out of the desire of certain post-war European governments to come up with a solution to ‘the Jewish refugee problem’.

Of course Zionism meant something a little different back then.

British Pathé recently uploaded some historical footage to their youtube channel showing some documented incidents of Zionist terrorism leading up to the Nakba.

According to the British military at that time, the Zionists terrorist “threatened reign of terror” needed to be rooted out of Palestine.

According to Wiki, Zionist terrorism by Jewish paramilitary groups, like the Irgun, initially trained by the British Military during the 1st world war (which is why they often had possession of British weapons and uniforms), started back in the early 1920’s and even targeted British authorities and United Nations personnel, as well as Palestinian Arab fighters and civilians.

The aim of the Zionist terrorists was to gain control over land, immigration and, essentially, over Palestine. As well as attacks on personnel and civilians, they attacked domestic and commercial properties, government buildings and infrastructure.

1946. British military searches uncover hidden Zionist weapons stores containing British and German weapons.

Irgun militants started bombing Palestinian Arab civilian targets in 1938, while at the same time the British Mandatory authorities were working to disarm Palestinian Arabs and promising them that the British authorities would be imposing significant limits on Jewish immigration. No effort was made to disarm the Zionist militias.

The Haganah and Irgun Zionist militias only suspended terrorist activities against the British when Britain declared war against Nazi Germany in 1939.

However, other Zionist terrorist groups, like the Lehi, actually continued attacking the British throughout the 2nd world war.

At the same time the British were now training and equipping a new Zionist unit – the Palmach – to respond to any German offensive in the region.

The Irgun then resumed attacks on British soldiers and policemen immediately after the war was over. The Haganah and the Palmach militias would also actively join the Jewish Resistance Movement for a period of time.

Wiki lists a sequence of Zionist terrorist attackscommitted by the Irgun, Haganah and Lehi militias between June 1924 and September 1948…

  • June 30, 1924. Dutch Jew Jacob Israël de Haan was assassinated by Avraham Tehomi on the orders of Haganah leader Yitzhak Ben-Zvi for his anti-Zionist political activities and contacts with Arab leaders.
  • 1937–1939 During the later stages of the 1936-1939 Arab Revolt in Mandatory Palestine The Irgun conducted a campaign of violence against Palestinian Arab civilians resulting in the deaths of at least 250.
  • July 15, 1938. A bomb left in the vegetable market in Jerusalem by the Irgun injured 28.
  • July 25, 1938. The Irgun threw a bomb into the melon market in Haifa resulting in 49 deaths.
  • November 6, 1944. Lehi assassinated British minister Lord Moyne in Cairo, Kingdom of Egypt. The action was condemned by the Yishuv at the time, but the bodies of the assassins were brought home from Egypt in 1975 to a state funeral and burial on Mount Herzl.
  • 1944–1945. The killings of several suspected collaborators with the Haganah and the British mandate government during the Hunting Season.
  • Letter bombs sent to British officials, including foreign minister Ernst Bevin, by Lehi.
  • July 26, 1946. The bombing of British administrative headquarters at the King David Hotel, killing 91 people — 28 British, 41 Arab, 17 Jewish and 5 others. Around 45 people were injured. In the literature about the practice and history of terrorism, it has been called one of the most lethal terrorist attacks of the 20th century.
  • Railways and British military airfields were attacked several times.
    Workers clearing a train wreck on a railway line after explosives were detonated on a stationary freight train by Zionist terror groups
  • October 31, 1946. The bombing by the Irgun of the British Embassy in Rome. Nearly half the building was destroyed and 3 people were injured.
  • April 16, 1947. An Irgun bomb placed at the Colonial Office in London failed to detonate.
  • The woman arrested for planting the bomb, alias “Esther,” was identified as a Jewess claiming French nationality by the Scotland Yard unit investigating Jewish terrorist activities. The attack was linked to the 1946 Rome embassy bombing.
    1946. Bombing of Tel Aviv Area Security Office by Zionist groups in which several people died.
  • 14 June 1947. The Reuters office in Tel Aviv was raided by “Jewish terrorists.”
  • July 25, 1947. The Sergeants affair: When death sentences were passed on two Irgun members, the Irgun kidnapped Sgt. Clifford Martin and Sgt. Mervyn Paice and threatened to kill them in retaliation if the sentences were carried out. When the threat was ignored, the hostages were killed. Afterwards, their bodies were taken to an orange grove and left hanging by the neck from trees. An improvised explosive device was set. This went off when one of the bodies was cut down, seriously wounding a British officer.The bodies of Sgts Clifford Martin & Mervyn Paice, left hanging by their necks in an orange grove.
  • December 1947 – March 1948. Numerous attacks on Palestinian Arabs in the context of civil war after the vote of the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine.
  • 1947 Letter bombs sent to the Truman White House by Lehi.
  • January 5–6, 1948. The Semiramis Hotel bombing, carried out by the Haganah (or, according to some sources, Irgun) resulted in the deaths of 24 to 26 people.
  • April 1948. The Deir Yassin massacre carried out by the Irgun and Lehi, killed between 107 and 120 Palestinian villagers, the estimate generally accepted by scholars.
  • September 17, 1948 Lehi assassination of the United Nations mediator Folke Bernadotte, whom Lehi accused of a pro-Arab stance during the cease-fire negotiations.

 

In February 1947, the British announced their withdrawal from Palestine, passing arbitration over to the United Nations and leaving a powder keg behind. However, unlike the Palestinians, who had effectively been disarmed by the British, the Zionist malitias were, by now, well trained and well equipped, thanks to the British military.

As the UN voted in favour of the partition of Palestine on 30 November 1947, they effectively lit the powder keg and war ensued.

Jewish militias immediately launched various terrorist attacks. Over the coming months we would see a spree of bombing attacks by Zionist terrorists. A car bomb killed 20 people in Damascus, a lorry bomb in Jaffa’s Town Hall targeted the headquarters of the paramilitary Najjada and killed 15 people, the Semiramis Hotel in Jerusalem was bombed killing 24 people, a barrel bomb was rolled into a large group of civilians waiting for a bus at the Jaffa Gate and killed about 16 people, Ramla market was bombed killing 7 people and a garage in Haifa was bombed killing a further 30 people.

Then, in April, the terrorists moved to control the territory and committed numerous atrocities. Arabs in Tiberias, Safed, Haifa, Jaffa, Beisan and Acre and also in neighbouring villages were forced to flee their homes and during the Battle for Jerusalem most Arab villages along the Tel Aviv / Jerusalem corridor were completely destroyed.

Whichever side of the fence you sit on over the question of partition or who you believe should control Palestine, what no one can deny is the fact Zionism is not a religion, it does not represent any specific ethnic or cultural group, it is not an exclusively Jewish ideology and for many Zionist, it advocates ongoing terrorism, occupation and subjugation of an indigenous Semitic population.

So, the question we must all ask ourselves today is, why has Zionist terrorism been brushed under the carpet and how has Zionism morphed into a protected ideology, of which any criticism is instantly denounced as anti-Semitism?

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