Jews Behind the LGBTQ Movement

Evangelical mom fights Texas school district when told her transgender kindergartner will be barred from using the girls’ bathroom

“Muslims, Buddhists, Sikhs, Hindus, atheists — they don’t agree with us on much of anything. But we talk with them.”

[They’re aim is to guilt dumb parents and are especially successful at inspiring warped Christian Zionists]

As Jewish leaders working for LGBTQ equality and racial justice in Jewish life, our emotions run deep this month: June marks two historical moments of liberation. Fifty years ago, LGBTQ people resisted a violent police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City, sparking the start of the modern LGBT rights movement and signaling to the world that trans women, drag queens, gay men, lesbians, and other queer people demanded dignity, equal rights, and freedom.

More than 100 years before that transformative night at a New York City bar, the course of history changed forever in the American South. On June 19, 1865, a Union Army general arrived in Texas and shared the news that the Civil War had ended, and that enslaved African Americans were now free.

Known by many as “Juneteenth”, this day is considered the most historic celebration of the end of slavery in the United States.


DRAG queens are to read fairytales to schoolchildren to raise LGBT awareness.
Normalizing it for YOUR kids. LGBT awareness is the law!

As we reflect on the power of these historical moments, we are troubled by how the struggles for LGBTQ rights and Black liberation are often viewed as separate, unrelated movements. And yet, these two histories — and our ongoing work for LGBTQ equality and racial justice today — are deeply intertwined and profoundly interdependent.

People of color are at the heart of Stonewall. Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, both trans women of color, led the fight at the Stonewall Inn. And yet, they are often omitted from the story of Stonewall and excluded from the traditional canons of Black and Latinx American history.

As Jewish colleagues of different racial and cultural backgrounds, we understand the power of our own histories and the shared responsibility we have to work for justice, especially in challenging, painful, or violent times. The stories we tell of our past inform possibilities for a better present and future.

So, as leaders committed to LGBTQ equality and racial justice, we ask our Jewish communities: What would it look like to integrate these commitments and ensure that we value them equally? What would it take for synagogues, day schools, summer camps, and other Jewish institutions to invest wholeheartedly in both racial justice and LGBTQ equality?

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