The Little Jew : (Levi, The Dancing Cockroach)

Pastor’s Review: The Little Jew
This book is fun and learning combined.  Most importantly, they will remember Jewish characters from the Bible and associate them with members of the insect world. I use the same method to remember the names of Jewish people I meet when our church visits the Holy Land each year.

Found at landoverbaptist.org. Christian satire?


Summary: A delightful children’s book for Christian youngsters age 5-10. Levi, The Dancing Cockroach teaches kids about Jewish behavior, traditions, and culture, in a fun and easy to remember way. Christian educators are excited about this book! The story follows greedy little Levi, a dancing cockroach on the adventure of a lifetime! Journey with “the dirtiest little critter on earth” through the sewers of New York City to the altar of the First Baptist Church in Alabama.

The whole family will enjoy this important book. It teaches young people valuable moral lessons by using true to life anecdotes. Kids will learn about Jewish traditions and visit the inside of a tiny little synagogue in a shoebox where Levi and his fellow insects think they are praying to God. Youngsters will even learn about nature and the insect world as they meet different characters through the eyes of Levi, the Cockroach. We need to mention that some younger children might be frightened by the pictures of Marty, the Maggot as he is transformed into the very scary Rabbi Horsefly.

Kids will fall in love with Levi, the Cockroach as he dances in a flea circus with his relatives. He eats the dollar bills that are thrown at him every day until one day, a nice Christian man throws Levi a paper with a New Testament verse on it. Levi cannot eat it. He gets very ill and almost dies. While he is sick, he begins to read the paper and decides to give his life to Jesus Christ. His parents get very upset with him. “Levi!” they say, “you know that cockroaches don’t believe in Jesus! He’s for human beings!”

Pastor’s Review: The Little Jew
This book is fun and learning combined. Kids can learn Bible truth in a way they will never forget. The story will build a strong lesson in their fragile little eggshell minds that will last a lifetime! Most importantly, they will remember Jewish characters from the Bible and associate them with members of the insect world. I use the same method to remember the names of Jewish people I meet when our church visits the Holy Land each year.

 The American Jew - Cover NEW

Has the Jew taken any part in herculean labors of brain and sinew? Has he planned the railways, the canals, or other means of communication, or risked his gold in their construction? Has the stroke of his axe rung through the backwood, or the heavy thud of his pick resounded through the caverns of the mine? Has he guided his plough on the pathless prairie, or bent his back to the construction of the iron ways? Has he quarried the rock, or made brick, or built cities, or cut canals, or tilled the willing soil? Has he hewn timber, or floated the perilous raft, or smelted the iron ore, or forged the glowing metal with the ponderous stroke of the heavy hammer? There is but one answer: No Jew has taken part in any of these labors.
What, then: is he a man of cunning brain, who has invented the unrivaled machinery which enables one man to do the work of a hundred; or has he studied the chemical properties of matter, and guided the nations to its triumphs in mechanics and the arts, or aided in organizing the unskilled labor of the country to useful ends? Again, there is but one answer: He has had no part in any of these things. The Jew despises useful labor, he has no industrial aptitudes, he holds labor as derogatory to the dignity of his race. He sees in the industrial energies, and cunning brain, and bold enterprise of the Aryan, a providential provision for his needs.
https://katana17.wordpress.com/2015/02/13/the-american-jew-an-expose-of-his-career-part-1/