“War is a force that gives us (them) meaning”

If America actually “won,” many of their (well paid) jobs would be superfluous.

A  speechwriter for George W. Bush was memorably ordered to produce “in a sentence or two our best case for going after Iraq.” In other words, he was to make a case for the invasion of that country in the president’s 2002 State of the Union address. At that time, with America’s superpower enemy, the Soviet Union, long gone and the U.S. seemingly unopposed on planet Earth, he somehow found three weak countries — Iraq, Iran, and North Korea — to turn into a World War II-style “axis of evil.” In doing so, he produced this memorable passage for the president:

“States like these, and their terrorist allies, constitute an axis of evil, arming to threaten the peace of the world. By seeking weapons of mass destruction, these regimes pose a grave and growing danger. They could provide these arms to terrorists, giving them the means to match their hatred. They could attack our allies or attempt to blackmail the United States. In any of these cases, the price of indifference would be catastrophic.”

Mission accomplished! No matter that neither Iraq, nor the other two countries were anywhere near having nukes.*

I am sure 9-11 was a joint and combined military operation, using boys who were recruited via A.Q. Khan’s Israeli network in Pakistan and South Africa through Zionists in Hamburg. I believe that certain MI6 British Zionists with the Ian Goodwin-Peter Goodwin-Basil Cardinal Hume Yorkshire network were also involved in funding and recruiting these guys. It was a large and ongoing operation to set up and involved lots of CIA Zionists and lots of funny money.-Kay Griggs

12 Reasons America Doesn’t Win Its Wars

We can’t absorb many casualties, so to minimize them we bomb and obliterate whole villages and towns (think Fallujah), creating a constant supply of new enemies.

America doesn’t “win” its wars, because winning a war is secondary to other goals in our war making. Winning or losing has little immediate consequence for the United States, because the wars we start, Wars of Choice, are not of vital national interest; losing doesn’t mean getting invaded or our cities being destroyed. The following are some of the interests Washington has in not winning, reasons for our unending wars.

1) War sustains the (very) profitable log-rolling contracts for supplies in key congressional districts, grants for university faculties to study strategy, new funding for new weapons. During wartime who dares question almost any Pentagon cost “to defend America?”

2) Continued conflict postpones hard decisions about cutting defense spending such as closing surplus bases, cutting duplicate systems, and focusing on waste. See 16 Ways to Cut Defense. Shakespeare put it well, advising a king to have lots of foreign wars in order to have tranquility at home.

3) Starting wars is the historic way for kings (and presidents) to gain popularity and avoid doing tough domestic reforms for problems that cry out for solutions. War lets them be postponed. Think of George W. Bush winning election on promises to balance the budget, have health care reform, reform our bankrupt social security commitments, tackle the EPA, take on the teachers’ unions, rebuild our crumbling infrastructure, and such. Instead, with war, all those issues were swept aside. He won his re-election by having even bigger deficit warfare/welfare spending and increasing the national debt by trillions.

Chris Hedges: “War is a force that gives us meaning.”

4) Private “contractors” profit from continuing crises. They don’t get paid in peacetime like ordinary soldiers, rather profiting from war, or at least from America having more enemies to guard against. In Iraq and Afghanistan we had hundreds of thousands of them, very well paid (often former military) and now largely in lesser-paid jobs.

5) Washington’s community prospers. Think tank intellectuals get lots of TV exposure and lectures, new funding produces new jobs and government grants and trips to the excitement of battlefields, or at least to comfy headquarters, to study the “enemy.” Congressmen get more TV time; critics can be condemned for hurting the war effort or even aiding the enemy. Everyone feels important. Heritage Foundation interns were recruited to help administer Iraq, and while not every war produces jobs even for interns, money flows everywhere.

6) Cable TV gets more viewers (e.g. more advertising revenue). Instead of interminable, boring coverage of the same old event, think of CNN’s repeated coverage of the disappeared Malaysian airliner for weeks, wars are exciting and gain 24-hour coverage and viewers.

7) Military careers. Our Army and Navy are designed for past wars where soldiers and sailors were mostly identically trained to be able to fill identical slots for fallen comrades or sunken ships. Officer careers were based upon well-rounded experience and commands. Third world wars are different. In nations without a rule of law everything is based upon personal relationships with tribal and military leaders.

The British and Roman empires sent out staffers to spend a lifetime gaining confidences and studying different tribes, religions, and local issues. For America, every officer has dozens behind him wanting to get some “war” experience on their resumes. So officers rarely stay longer than a year on any battlefield posting, barely enough time to learn the area and gain the confidence of local leaders, much less learn their languages. Long, interminable wars allow for many more officers to get “their tickets punched,” as the saying goes.

8) We can’t absorb many casualties, so to minimize them we bomb and obliterate whole villages and towns (think Fallujah), creating a constant supply of new enemies. If winning was really important we would have to absorb many more casualties and station many more troops for many more years to occupy and pacify the conquered (liberated) nations. Instead we just fight on for years without end.

9) Few Americans want to spend lifetimes studying tribes, religions, and customs in obscure, boring, and uncomfortable regions of the world. The British Empire was heavily staffed by poor Scots and Irish who could find few jobs at home. America does not have that problem facing the skilled, educated elites capable of administering far-flung possessions.

10) Our Congress is more concerned with appearances than winning. Political grandstanding, appearing tough, and pandering to local constituencies are the main objectives for most of them. Think of Iran, where no peace agreement acceptable to Iran and our European allies is likely to gain Congressional approval. Another unending war is more likely and could easily expand to blowing up oil and gas resources all over the Persian Gulf.

11) Our internal security establishment, costing hundreds of billions, needs threats. Think of how often the FBI provides fake bombs and weapons to wannabe terrorist young macho males dreaming of acting out their fantasies. Unending wars fulfill this need. If America actually “won,” many of their (well paid) jobs would be superfluous.

12) We are very vulnerable to false flag operations and paid foreign propaganda. Various foreign nations or rebel interests want us to bomb and/or invade their local enemies. Our recent attack on Libya was based on false information, spread by our allies. Saudi Arabia wants us to destroy Iran, Turkey wanted us to attack Assad in Syria, Israeli (and neocon) hawks wanted us to “rip apart” Iraq. Kuwait’s sheiks paid millions for a PR campaign for America to attack Iraq the first time, and so on.

We could “win” if we followed Sun Tzu and learned from history and from the advice of our founding fathers. But, as stated above, we don’t really want to win; too many Americans benefit from unending wars.

We are not the first empire to confront this problem. However, in the past such unending wars were limited by their costs. But America can always, so far, borrow the money from foreigners. Think though how the Chinese, who have loaned us much of the money, benefit from America eventually weakening itself from continually bashing our heads against religious fanatics, causing the deaths of hundreds of thousands of innocents and making enemies of much of the Muslim world. As Rand Paul commented, it was American war hawks who created ISIS and much of the chaos in the Middle East. Yet we don’t really lose wars either. As retired Marine four-star General Mattis says, America doesn’t lose wars, it just loses interest and withdraws from fighting them.

Ideas to limit Washington’s profligacy of interventions are beginning to break through into the media, though. Fareed Zakaria supported Rand Paul, writing that he was “forcing Republicans and many Democrats to defend what has become a lazy, smug consensus in favor of an ever-expanding national security state.” The very respected Peggy Noonan now writes that “we spend too much on the military which not only adds to our debt, but guarantees that our weapons will be used.” She quotes policy expert Ian Bremmer—“Policy makers will find uses for them to justify their expense which will implicate us in crises that are none of our business.”

Israel Is Using Technology to Avoid Facing What It’s Doing to Palestinians

“At this stage, we’ve resorted to using technological manipulation on ourselves to put ourselves through some mental training so we’ll be able to cope with this challenge. Or we could always develop new technologies of self-deception and look for other ways to heal the psyches of the snipers who shoot at civilians on the border. Hallucinogenic mushrooms, perhaps.”

 “A formerly frightened and anxiety-ridden Israel has become a confident society reveling in its prosperous state. In the past couple of years, even the sort of paranoia that was once so characteristic of Israelis has been replaced by a new kind of attitude: Everything’s great, we’re strong, we’re popular, everyone loves us and we love ourselves.”

 

haaretz.com Apr 04, 2018

Israeli style

In the summer of 2017, Israeli news sites reported on a new technology developed in the labs of the Israel Defense Forces: software to combat post-traumatic stress disorder. The computer program was intended for initial use among combat soldiers at the front, training them to identify “threatening motifs” and boost their resistance to post-traumatic stress.

The development was publicized around the time it was reported that 143 soldiers who fought in the 2014 Gaza war had been officially recognized as suffering from PTSD. Israeli society had moved on quickly since then, leaving behind the bloody Gaza incursion to deal with countless other issues. But for the returning soldiers, the horror didn’t just fade away. The cries of terror, the shattered bodies and the feelings of helplessness return in flashbacks at unpredictable moments.

Jewish Israelis were almost universally convinced that the war in Gaza was just and necessary, and the highly motivated troops who raided Gaza neighborhoods were backed by expressions of encouragement, uplifting songs by top singers and the exhortations of military rabbis and television personalities. Still, it turns out that when you send Generation Y on military incursions into densely built areas, it leaves a certain mark on their souls.

How does Israel deal with the problem? It invents a new technology, of course. “Attention training” is what the head of the mental-health branch of the ground forces called it, explaining that it would improve performance and reduce the dropout rate from military service. And in the future there will reportedly be trauma treatment using virtual reality, and perhaps also the assistance of MDMA (aka ecstasy). These may well be important developments, but they also encapsulate modern Israel’s essential problem: the conviction that any difficulty has a technological solution.

Over his years as prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu has managed to boost Israeli morale to unprecedented levels. Many Israelis feel an ongoing sense of euphoria – as if they lived in a utopia that has been realized. Columnist Israel Harel was actually quite right when he wrote in a column last week that Israel is currently at full blossom.

A formerly frightened and anxiety-ridden Israel has become a confident society reveling in its prosperous state. In the past couple of years, even the sort of paranoia that was once so characteristic of Israelis has been replaced by a new kind of attitude: Everything’s great, we’re strong, we’re popular, everyone loves us and we love ourselves.

Actually, Israel managed to overcome many of the problems that threatened it in the past with the help of technological solutions. The rockets that threatened Israel’s border areas are now intercepted by the Iron Dome system. The wave of refugees from Africa was stopped by a wall. A water crisis was contained by desalination plants. The demographic threat is countered by advances in infertility treatments. And BDS is countered by the efforts of trained teams of responders and propagandists on social media.

Image result for israelis plant knives on palestinian

Israel planting knives after they kill Palestinians

Even the “knife intifada” was neutralized by some sort of algorithm that enabled a potential attacker to be identified before he even knew that this is what he was. For nearly every threat, the country has come up with an appropriate technological solution. A patch has been fashioned for every security breach. This can be seen as quite impressive and admirable.

But in fact no political problem has been resolved. The Palestinians are still here and there is evidence that they are the majority in the area between the sea and the Jordan River. So the situation remains unchanged, solely thanks to means of brutal coercion.

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Muslims and Jews in peace in #Jerusalem before Zionism. Jews aren’t responsible for Zionists actions.


The Jewish state has developed an amazing ability to manage human masses on a large scale. With the aid of walls, checkpoints, alliances, hormones, software programs and other sophisticated measures, it manages the Palestinian and Jewish populations so as to rein in the pressure exerted on the regime. Using history-stopping technology, it has been able to slow down historical processes that seemed unavoidable.

But over time, the tension entailed in the Zionist regime having subjects who don’t enjoy political rights is pushing the authorities to employ ever more desperate measures. Pleasure-loving Israel yearns to repress its consciousness of the Palestinians and is itching to get them out of its system, lest it be forced to acknowledge that there are other human beings here with legitimate aspirations. These aren’t people just like you, we’re told, they’re “threatening motifs,” video-game monsters that must be eliminated in order to advance to the next stage. And they keep popping up all the time.

At this stage, we’ve resorted to using technological manipulation on ourselves to put ourselves through some mental training so we’ll be able to cope with this challenge.

In this way, we’ve reached a situation in which hundreds of snipers fire at unarmed protesters and kill them at a rate of 10 a day – and no one refuses an order. In the first intifada, or even the second, such a situation would have been cause for shock and horror. But not anymore. We’ve trained ourselves – using ideology, religion, algorithms, mindfulness, whatever – to reach a state of consciousness that enables us to overcome the basic instinct of compassion that’s normally aroused in the face of human suffering.

These thousands of people on the other side of the fence are described by every type of label. Politicians and analysts depict them as rioters, inciters, terrorists, enemies, infiltrators, Islamists, anti-Semites, even homophobes. But as the television commentators like to say, let there be no mistake about it: These things – with arms and legs and heads – are also called “human beings.”

Image result for Jerusalem before zionism

Beautiful picture of Jerusalem in It was all beautiful and Palestinian back then before Zionist occupation.

And their refusal to accept a life in which they’re penned in is just what makes them human. Their main crime, for which they’re being sprayed with tear gas, rubber bullets and live fire, is having had the audacity to appear in our field of vision just when we were about to sit down and eat matza with haroset.

A year ago, Israel managed to nearly completely obscure the 50th anniversary of the occupation. Consequently, its arrogance grew, and it plans to stage its 70th birthday celebration this month as an orgy of self-pleasure. Empowered by Donald Trump’s declarations of love, Netanyahu and his government aim to bury the Palestinian project once and for all under 70 hours of hora dancing. But then somebody had to go and spoil the fun.

So in a way, the marches held by the Palestinians are cause for hope – because they force Israelis to remember that they live in this land alongside another people, with desires of its own. With or without Trump’s support, we’ll have to take this into account. Or we could always develop new technologies of self-deception and look for other ways to heal the psyches of the snipers who shoot at civilians on the border. Hallucinogenic mushrooms, perhaps.